Nearly one-in-five teens can’t always finish their homework because of the digital divide

Nearly one-in-five teens can’t always finish their homework because of the digital divide by an author
Research report from Monica Anderson and Andrew Perrin from the Pew Research Center. Full report here (PDF). All annotations in context. Some 15% of U.S. households with school-age children do not have a high-speed internet connection at home, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of 2015 U.S. Census Bureau data. New survey findings…

The Digital Gap Between Rich and Poor Kids Is Not What We Expected

The Digital Gap Between Rich and Poor Kids Is Not What We Expected by an author (nytimes.com)
America’s public schools are still touting devices with screens — even offering digital-only preschools. The rich are banning screens from class altogether.
Nellie Bowles in The NY Times. All annotations in context. It wasn’t long ago that the worry was that rich students would have access to the internet earlier, gaining tech skills and creating a digital divide. Schools ask students to do homework online, while only about two-thirds of people in the U.S. have broadband internet service. But now, as…

A Dark Consensus About Screens and Kids Begins to Emerge in Silicon Valley

A Dark Consensus About Screens and Kids Begins to Emerge in Silicon Valley by an author (nytimes.com)
“I am convinced the devil lives in our phones.”
Nellie Bowles in The NY Times. All annotations in context. The people who are closest to a thing are often the most wary of it. Technologists know how phones really work, and many have decided they don’t want their own children anywhere near them. A wariness that has been slowly brewing is turning into a regionwide…

Silicon Valley Nannies Are Phone Police for Kids

Silicon Valley Nannies Are Phone Police for Kids by an author (nytimes.com)
Child care contracts now demand that nannies hide phones, tablets, computers and TVs from their charges.
Nellie Bowles in The New York Times. All annotations in context. Silicon Valley parents are increasingly obsessed with keeping their children away from screens. Even a little screen time can be so deeply addictive, some parents believe, that it’s best if a child neither touches nor sees any of these glittering rectangles. These particular parents,…

ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2018

ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2018 by an author (EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR))
15th annual ECAR study of undergraduate students and information technology
The full report is available at the link above. I pulled quotes and graphics of interest to me in the materials below. As an example, I did not include results about quality of WIFI and LMS Use & Satisfaction in my overview. Key Findings Practically all college and university students have access to the most…

Do we still believe that networked youth can change the world?

Do we still believe that networked youth can change the world? by an author
An interesting discussion on activism and social networks between Henry Jenkins, Esra’a Al Shafei, & James Gee. Video Abstract by Henry Jenkins. PDF for full special issue is available here. Jenkins, H., Al Shafei, E., Gee, J. (2018). Do we still believe that networked youth can change the world? Special issue. Working Papers on Culture, Education…

We’re (still) not being alarmist enough about climate change

We’re (still) not being alarmist enough about climate change by an author (Anil Dash)
What if we had another 9/11, and nothing happened? Living in New York City, the one fantasy sport that everybody plays is real estate; we all like to imagine what it would be like to be able to afford to buy a place. And sometime over the last year
Anil Dash on his website: Honestly, that thought doesn't depress me (though I understand why for so many, it will). It's simply the work in front of us, the task we have to do. I don't feel hopeless because there's no point to feeling hopeless. We simply have to build a world that keeps working while the…

How to raise a non-materialistic kid

How to raise a non-materialistic kid by an author (Big Think)
Money makes the world go 'round. Unfortunately, it can make both children and adults into materialists.
Keeping a gratitude journal caused children to donate 60 percent more to charitable causes. Other methods suggested by researchers include daily gratitude reflection, gratitude posters, and keeping a "gratitude jar." Materialism has been shown to increase anxiety and depression and promote selfish attitudes and behavior.

The value of owning more books than you can read

The value of owning more books than you can read by an author (Big Think)
Or how I learned to stop worrying and love my tsundoku.
Many readers buy books with every intention of reading them only to let them linger on the shelf. Statistician Nassim Nicholas Taleb believes surrounding ourselves with unread books enriches our lives as they remind us of all we don't know. The Japanese call this practice tsundoku, and it may provide lasting benefits.