Computers have learned to make us jump through hoops

Computers have learned to make us jump through hoops | John Naughton by an author (the Guardian)
Machines are supposed to be tools that serve human ends, but the relationship is slowly shifting - and not in our favour
Increasingly we're not only being conditioned to operate as rats in an technological black box, but we're also training the box to make it smarter. "We shape our tools and the our tools shape us." The other day I had to log in to a service I hadn’t used before. Since I was a new…

Literacy Tools That Bring Equity and Energy to the Classroom—and Unlock Career Doors

Literacy Tools That Bring Equity and Energy to the Classroom—and Unlock Career Doors - EdSurge News by an author (EdSurge)
Reading was easy for Dr. Doug Fisher when he was growing up in San Diego, but it wasn’t for everybody.
A post from EdSurge that is sponsored content from Achieve3000. The post contains some great insight from Doug Fisher on literacy instruction, and opportunities to support learners in all classrooms. I think the future of literacy is about providing the inspiration to take action, to build public spirit. I think that’s in part why digital…

The future includes good (human) teachers

AI in education: The future includes good (human) teachers by an author (The Hechinger Report)
Some things just can’t be automated, and a teacher that makes you think is one of them.
As AI (artificial intelligence) takes over many aspects of our lives, people are beginning to wonder/examine the role of AI in education. This post posits that computers aren’t capable of the higher-order thinking that teachers can provide. Like robots on an automotive assembly line, English AI can work 24 hours a day, doesn’t require benefits…

A New Definition of Rigor

A New Definition of Rigor by an author (Edutopia)
Rigor doesn't simply mean giving students more or harder work. Instead, it's the result of work that challenges students' thinking in new and interesting ways.
Rigor is the result of work that challenges students' thinking in new and interesting ways. It occurs when they are encouraged toward a sophisticated understanding of fundamental ideas and are driven by curiosity to discover what they don't know. Rigor is not defined by the text -- it comes from what students do. It is…

To feel less depressed, limit social media use to 30 minutes a day

To feel less depressed, limit social media use to 30 minutes a day, researchers say by an author (Array)
A number of studies have by now correlated social media use with mental-health risks, such as loneliness and depression. But correlation isn’t causation, leaving a bit of a chicken-and-egg problem: Is social media actually behind these issues, or are people who are already depressed and lonely just more likely to spend time on social media?
A new study (PDF here) being published in December’s Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has tried to look into the causal side of things, and see whether people may actually feel better when they cut down on social media. Its conclusion: “Our findings strongly suggest that limiting social…

Brooklyn students hold walkout in protest of Facebook-designed online program

Brooklyn students hold walkout in protest of Facebook-designed online program by an author (New York Post)
Brooklyn teens are protesting their high school’s adoption of an online program spawned by Facebook, saying it forces them to stare at computers for hours and “teach ourselves.” Nearly 100 students…
Brooklyn teens are protesting their high school’s adoption of an online program spawned by Facebook, saying it forces them to stare at computers for hours and “teach ourselves.” This story provides an interesting counter-narrative for those that think that teachers will no longer be needed in an age of tech. A teacher who requested anonymity…

No, Scientists Are Not Smarter Than Non-Scientists

No, Scientists Are Not Smarter Than Non-Scientists by an author (Forbes)
The widespread belief that scientists are brainier than non-scientists is hurtful to everyone who doesn't fit the "scientist" stereotype.
Matthew R. Francis in Forbes. The way in which society views scientists as opposed to non-scientists. All annotations in context. Science writer Kat Arney delved into this issue in detail in a recent column for the (UK) Royal Society of Chemistry. As she points out, the problems with the "brainy scientist" stereotype are manifold: that science is…

Why Are We Still Teaching Reading the Wrong Way?

Why Are We Still Teaching Reading the Wrong Way? by an author (nytimes.com)
Teacher preparation programs continue to ignore the sound science behind how people become readers.
Emily Hanford in The NY Times. All annotations in context. This story has been bubbling up in the reading/literacy community over the last couple of months. This article is based on earlier work titled “Hard Words: Why Aren’t Kids Being Taught to Read?” I've only included a couple pull quotes in this piece that appear…

Younger Americans are better than older Americans at telling factual news statements from opinions

Younger Americans are better than older Americans at telling factual news statements from opinions by an author
While some say wisdom comes with age, younger Americans are better than their elders at separating factual from opinion statements in the news, according to a new analysis from Pew Research Center.
New research report from the Pew Research Center. All annotations in context. In a survey conducted Feb. 22 to March 4, 2018, the Center asked U.S. adults to categorize five factual statements and five opinion statements. As a previous report revealed, about a quarter of Americans overall could accurately classify all five factual statements (26%) and about…