in READ

Google tracks your movements, like it or not

Google tracks your movements, like it or not
Google wants to know where you go so badly that it records your movements even when you explicitly tell it not to.
Location tracking services have been built in to Google Maps, and most specifically Android phones for some time. Google added the ability to turn location tracking off. An investigation by the Associated Press found that many Google services on Android devices and iPhones store your location data even if you’ve used a privacy setting that says it will prevent Google from doing so.

The AP had their results confirmed by Computer-science researchers from Princeton.

Google says that will prevent the company from remembering where you’ve been. Google’s support page on the subject states: “You can turn off Location History at any time. With Location History off, the places you go are no longer stored.”

That isn’t true. Even with Location History paused, some Google apps automatically store time-stamped location data without asking. (It’s possible, although laborious, to delete it .)

For example, Google stores a snapshot of where you are when you merely open its Maps app. Automatic daily weather updates on Android phones pinpoint roughly where you are. And some searches that have nothing to do with location, like “chocolate chip cookies,” or “kids science kits,” pinpoint your precise latitude and longitude — accurate to the square foot — and save it to your Google account.

The privacy issue affects some two billion users of devices that run Google’s Android operating software and hundreds of millions of worldwide iPhone users who rely on Google for maps or search.

In response, Google says that they were explicit in what they’re doing and how data/privacy is regulated in the settings.

“If you’re going to allow users to turn off something called ‘Location History,’ then all the places where you maintain location history should be turned off,” Mayer said. “That seems like a pretty straightforward position to have.”

Google says it is being perfectly clear.

“There are a number of different ways that Google may use location to improve people’s experience, including: Location History, Web and App Activity, and through device-level Location Services,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement to the AP. “We provide clear descriptions of these tools, and robust controls so people can turn them on or off, and delete their histories at any time.”

The challenge is often that technology companies often give users very fine-grained settings to data, but “normal” users don’t know have to take advantage of, or differentiate between these settings. This is eloquently stated by some lawmakers in the U.S.

Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia told the AP it is “frustratingly common” for technology companies “to have corporate practices that diverge wildly from the totally reasonable expectations of their users,” and urged policies that would give users more control of their data. Rep. Frank Pallone of New Jersey called for “comprehensive consumer privacy and data security legislation” in the wake of the AP report.

The post goes on to provide great detail about the role of location data, privacy issues, and the connection between services and ads Google provides you. I recommend reading this section on the main post. I also recommend clicking through the interactive section of the post to get a better idea of what this data looks like plotted on a map…to see if you would be fine with it.

The post concludes:

Google also says location records stored in My Activity are used to target ads. Ad buyers can target ads to specific locations — say, a mile radius around a particular landmark — and typically have to pay more to reach this narrower audience.

While disabling “Web & App Activity” will stop Google from storing location markers, it also prevents Google from storing information generated by searches and other activity. That can limit the effectiveness of the Google Assistant, the company’s digital concierge.

Sean O’Brien, a Yale Privacy Lab researcher with whom the AP shared its findings, said it is “disingenuous” for Google to continuously record these locations even when users disable Location History. “To me, it’s something people should know,” he said.

 

All annotations in context.

Reposts

  • Carl Young
  • Ryan R. Goble, Ed.D. 🌈
  • Silvia
  • alan macdougall

Mentions

  • Aaron Davis

Write a Comment

Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Webmentions

  • Aaron Davis mentioned this bookmark on collect.readwriterespond.com.

  • Spencer Brayton liked this bookmark on twitter.com.

  • Carl Young liked this bookmark on twitter.com.

  • Carl Young reposted this bookmark on twitter.com.

  • Ryan R. Goble, Ed.D. 🌈 reposted this bookmark on twitter.com.

  • paul martin liked this bookmark on twitter.com.

  • Silvia reposted this bookmark on twitter.com.

  • Natasha Casey liked this bookmark on twitter.com.

  • alan macdougall liked this bookmark on twitter.com.

  • alan macdougall reposted this bookmark on twitter.com.